StnDrd Infusion - Investor Information

To provide a medical perspective, StnDrd Infusion's group will invite Matthew Baretich, P.E., Ph.D., to meet with serious investors. Mr. Baretich's qualifications are extensive.

Current Position

President, Baretich Engineering, Inc. ( Fort Collins , Colorado ):

  • Clinical Engineering: Program evaluation, Joint Commission standards compliance, medical equipment planning, CE-IT convergence.
  • Facilities Engineering: Program evaluation, Joint Commission standards compliance and SOC preparation, construction project management.
  • Forensic Engineering: Incident investigation and expert witness services related to medical technology and building systems.

Education, Credentials, and Awards

  • Ph.D., Hospital and Health Administration, University of Iowa
  • M.S., Biomedical Engineering, Iowa State University
  • B.S., Electrical Engineering, Iowa State University
  • Registered Professional Engineer (PE), State of Colorado
  • Certified Clinical Engineer (CCE), Healthcare Technology Certification Commission

To view a complete list of Mr. Baretich's credentials, please access his website at: http://www.baretich.com/qualifications.html


Please fill out our NDA form [Click here for PDF form] and contact us to gain access to the privileged information section of our site where you can view videos of the prototype pump operation, the business plan, and a Power Point presentation explaining the advantages of this patented IV pump design.


 

Why Invest? - Industry News


Medical device market poised to hit $300B

HealthImaging.com
January 5, 2011

The market for medical devices will enjoy 4 to 6 percent growth in the next few years, driving total revenue to $312 billion in 2011, a report by Kalorama Information predicted.

While the recession has hurt growth in the medical device market in recent years, with 2009 revenues valued at $290 billion, "Demand for healthcare services in emerging nations, the need for reducing hospital stays and the aging world population" will spark new growth, according to Kalorama's publisher, Bruce Carlson.

"Some categories of medical devices are commoditized and competition will hold prices in check, while in other areas revenues will flourish," continued Carlson. While hundreds of companies compete for a share of the medical device market, Kalorama said the majority of revenues will go to the top 30 companies, citing Johnson & Johnson, Siemens Healthcare, Medtronic, GE Healthcare and Baxter among them.

New York City-based Kalorama publishes medical market research in biotechnology, diagnostics, healthcare and pharmaceuticals. The report included devices ranging from MRI machines and laparoscopic surgical equipment to wheelchairs and medical gloves.

 


Medium-sized medical companies expected to grow


By Kathleen Gallagher of the Journal Sentinel
Jan. 2, 2011

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John C. Thompson

Big companies have suffered mightily during the last decade.
While their shares languished, small and medium-sized company stocks fared better.
"Mid- and small-cap have outperformed, which attracted money into those mutual funds, which means there's buying power in those funds," said John C. Thompson, chief executive and portfolio manager at Vilas Capital Management Inc. in Madison.
That buying power has fueled a self-perpetuating cycle that has helped the smaller issues continue to outperform bigger company shares, Thompson said.
It has also created opportunities for value-oriented investors, he said.
Thompson began looking for some of those opportunities in the health care market.
He strongly prefers medical device makers to pharmaceutical companies, with their more difficult business model. Because so many potential drugs fail, drug companies spend about $800 million a year and require seven to 10 years to get just one drug cleared by regulators. That leaves seven to 10 years of patent protection once a drug is on the market. When the patent expires, there's a huge revenue loss.
"Medical device companies don't have this patent cliff that regular drug companies, and now biotechs, face," Thompson said.
Medtronic Inc. (MDT, $37.09), Minneapolis, makes and sells defibrillators, pacemakers, spinal implant products, heart valves, blood glucose meters and other devices. Its shares have traded in a 52-week range of $30.80 to $46.66.
Medtronic is the biggest medical device company and by far the cheapest one, Thompson said. The company trades at about 10 times the coming year's earnings, well below its high of 60 times earnings 10 years ago, he said.
"It's been underperforming the market for a decade, even though earnings are growing nicely," he said.
Partly because of its size, Medtronic is no longer considered a company that will deliver spectacular growth.
But Thompson said the company is still a solid competitor in large markets, and it is expected to grow as baby boomers age.
Cardiac rhythm management and cardiovascular products deliver more than half Medtronic's revenue, but the company also has growth potential in its spinal, nervous system and diabetes product areas, Thompson said.
"They're a strong and innovative company that I think is going to continue to develop a number of neat technologies," he said.
Among the challenges Medtronic faces:
The recession has made it difficult to raise prices because hospitals are negotiating harder. There's also the risk a pacemaker or some other product will fail, prompting a recall, Thompson said.
But as the economy recovers and Medtronic rolls out new products, its shares could trade as high as $88 during the next three years, he said.

ABOUT THIS

The Journal Sentinel focuses on one Wisconsin money manager or analyst in this weekly feature, looking at a trend that helps investment pros make their decisions.

Matthew Baretich